Category Archives: MODIS

Eruption of Mount Sinabung volcano

Himawari-8 RGB images [click to play animation]

Himawari-8 RGB images [click to play animation]

An explosive eruption of Mount Sinabung began at 0153 UTC on 19 February 2018. Himawari-8 False-color Red-Green-Blue (RGB) images from the NOAA/CIMSS Volcanic Cloud Monitoring site (above) showed the primary plume of high-altitude ash moving northwestward, with ash at lower altitudes spreading out to the south and southeast of the volcano.

Mutli-spectral retrievals of Ash Cloud Height (below) indicated that the explosive eruption injected volcanic ash to altitudes generally within the 12-18 km range, possibly reaching heights of 18-20 km. Advisories issued by the Darwin VAAC listed the ash height at 45,000 feet (13.7 km).

Himawari-8 Ash Height product [click to play animation]

Himawari-8 Ash Height product [click to play animation]

Ash Loading values (below) were also very high within the high-altitude portion of the plume.

Himawari-8 Ash Loading product [click to play animation]

Himawari-8 Ash Loading product [click to play animation]

The Ash Effective Radius product (below) indicated that very large particles were present within the plume immediately downwind of the eruption site.

Himawari-8 Ash Effective Radius product [click to play animation]

Himawari-8 Ash Effective Radius product [click to play animation]

In a comparison of Himawari-8 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm), Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.4 µm) images (below), note the very pronounced warm thermal anomaly or “hot spot” (large cluster of red pixels) on the 0150 UTC image — Himawari-8 was actually scanning that location at 01:54:31 UTC, just after the 0153 UTC eruption. Prior to the main eruption, beginning at 0120 UTC a very narrow volcanic cloud — likely composed primarily of condensed steam — was seen streaming rapidly southward from the volcano summit.

Himawari-8

Himawari-8 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm, left), Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm, center) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.4 µm, right) images [click to play Animated GIF | MP4 also available]

The coldest Himawari-8 cloud-top infrared brightness temperature was -73 ºC at 0300 UTC, which roughly corresponded to an altitude of 15 km on the nearby WIMM Medan rawinsonde data at 00 UTC (below).

Medan, Indonesia rawinsonde data at 00 UTC on 19 February [click to enlarge]

Medan, Indonesia rawinsonde data at 00 UTC on 19 February [click to enlarge]

A Terra MODIS True-color RGB image viewed using RealEarth is shown below. The time of the Terra satellite overpass was 0410 UTC.

Terra MODIS True-color RGB image [click to enlarge]

Terra MODIS True-color RGB image [click to enlarge]

An animation of Himawari-8 True-color RGB images can be seen here.

Cyclone Kelvin makes landfall in Australia

Himawari-8 Visible (0.64 µm, left) and Infrared Window (10.4 µm, right) images, with hourly surface plots at Broome [click to play Animated GIF | MP4 also available]

Himawari-8 Visible (0.64 µm, left) and Infrared Window (10.4 µm, right) images, with hourly surface plots at Broome, Australia [click to play Animated GIF | MP4 also available]

Himawari-8 Visible (0.64 µm) and Infrared Window (10.4 µm) images (above) showed Cyclone Kelvin as it made landfall in Western Australia as a Category 1 storm on 18 February 2018. Kelvin continued to intensify shortly after making landfall, with estimated winds of 80 gusting to 100 knots — and a distinct eye feature could be seen in the Visible and Infrared imagery (as well as Broome radar data).

A longer animation of Himawari-8 Infrared Window (10.4 µm) images (below) revealed a very large convective burst as Kelvin meandered near the coast early on 17 February — periodic cloud-top infrared brightness temperatures of -90 ºC or colder were seen. After making landfall, the eye structure eventually deteriorated by 18 UTC on 18 February.

Himawari-8 Infrared Window (10.4 µm) images, with hourly surface plots [click to play MP4 | Animated GIF also available]

Himawari-8 Infrared Window (10.4 µm) images, with hourly surface plots [click to play MP4 | Animated GIF also available]

The MIMIC-TC product (below) showed the development of Kelvin’s compact eye during the 17 February – 18 February period; the eye was well-defined around the time of landfall (2147 UTC image on 17 February), and persisted for at least 18 hours (1556 UTC image on 18 February) until rapidly dissipating by 21 UTC.

MIMIC-TC morphed microwave imagery [click to enlarge]

MIMIC-TC morphed microwave imagery [click to enlarge]

Himawari-8 Deep Layer Wind Shear values remained very low — generally 5 knots or less — prior to, during and after the landfall of Kelvin, which also contributed to the slow rate of weakening. In addition, an upward moisture flux from the warm/wet sandy soil of that region helped Kelvin to intensify after landfall; land surface friction was also small, since that portion of Northwest Australia is rather flat.

Himawari-8 Water Vapor images, with Deep Layer Wind Shear product [click to enlarge]

Himawari-8 Water Vapor images, with Deep Layer Wind Shear product [click to enlarge]

The eye of Cyclone Kelvin could also be seen in Terra MODIS and Suomi NPP VIIRS True-color Red-Green-Blue (RGB) images, viewed using RealEarth (below). The actual times of the Terra and Suomi NPP satellite overpasses were 0154 UTC and 0452 UTC on 18 February, respectively.

Terra MODIS and Suomi NPP VIIRS True-color RGB images [click to enlarge]

Terra MODIS and Suomi NPP VIIRS True-color RGB images [click to enlarge]

Ice motion in the Great Lakes

GOES-16 "Red" Visible (0.64 µm) images, with hourly plots of surface wind barbs in cyan and wind gusts (kn0ts) in red (click to play Animated GIF)

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images, with hourly plots of surface wind barbs in cyan and wind gusts (knots) in red (click to play Animated GIF | MP4 also available)

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images showed ice motion in the western Great Lakes (above) and the central/eastern Great Lakes (below) on 14 February 2018. A flow of southwesterly winds at the surface was helping to move the lake ice toward the northeast. With increasing winds and a return of warmer air, the ice coverage of Lake Superior, Lake Michigan and Lake Huron had decreased slightly from their seasonal peaks a few days earlier — while the ice coverage for Lake Erie remained neared its seasonal peak. The total ice coverage for the Great Lakes as a whole was 57.9% on this day.

GOES-16

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images, with hourly plots of surface wind barbs in cyan and wind gusts (knots) in red (click to play Animated GIF | MP4 also available)

Closer views of southern Lake Michigan and southern Lake Huron are shown below. In Lake Huron, small ice floes can be seen breaking away from the land fast ice.

GOES-16

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images, with hourly plots of surface wind barbs in cyan and wind gusts (knots) in red (click to play Animated GIF | MP4 also available)

GOES-16

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images, with hourly plots of surface wind barbs in cyan and wind gusts (knots) in red (click to play Animated GIF | MP4 also available)

250-meter resolution Terra and Aqua MODIS True-color Red-Green-Blue (RGB) images from the MODIS Today site (below) provided more detailed views of the ice floes in southern Lake Michigan, southern Lake Huron and western Lake Erie. The Aqua satellite overpass was about 90 minutes later than that of Terra.

Terra and Aqua MODIS True-color RGB images of southern Lake Michigan [click to enlarge]

Terra and Aqua MODIS True-color RGB images of southern Lake Michigan [click to enlarge]

Terra and Aqua MODIS True-color RGB images of southern Lake Huron [click to enlarge]

Terra and Aqua MODIS True-color RGB images of southern Lake Huron [click to enlarge]

Terra and Aqua MODIS True-color RGB images of western Lake Erie [click to enlarge]

Terra and Aqua MODIS True-color RGB images of western Lake Erie [click to enlarge]

Large hail in Argentina

GOES-16

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm, top) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm, bottom) images, with hourly surface reports (metric units) for Córdoba, Argentina [click to play animated GIF — MP4 also available]

GOES-16 (GOES-East) “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm) images (above) showed the development of severe thunderstorms which produced very large hail in Córdoba, Argentina on 08 February 2018. Distinct above-anvil plumes were evident on the Visible imagery, with pulses of overshooting tops exhibiting Infrared brightness temperatures in the -70 to -80ºC range (black to white enhancement). The hail reportedly began around 1930 UTC or 4:30 PM local time.

The above-anvil plumes could also be seen in GOES-16 Near-Infrared “Snow/Ice” (1.61 µm) images (below).

GOES-16 Near-Infrared

GOES-16 Near-Infrared “Snow/Ice” (1.61 µm) images, with hourly surface reports (metric units) for Córdoba, Argentina [click to play animated GIF — MP4 also available]

An Aqua MODIS True-color Red-Green-Blue (RGB) image viewed using RealEarth (below) showed the thunderstorm just west of Córdoba around 1850 UTC.

Aqua MODIS True-color RGB image [click to enlarge]

Aqua MODIS True-color RGB image [click to enlarge]

According to the Worldview site, the coldest Aqua MODIS cloud-top infrared brightness temperature at that time was -78ºC (below).

Aqua MODIS True-color and Infrared Window (11.0 µm) images [click to enlarge]

Aqua MODIS True-color and Infrared Window (11.0 µm) images [click to enlarge]

A time series plot of surface observations at Córdoba (below) showed the warm temperatures and high dew points prior to the arrival of the thunderstorms; there were a number of hail reports between 19 UTC and 02 UTC (4 PM to 11 PM local time).

Time series of surface observations at Córdoba, Argentina [click to enlarge]

Time series of surface observations at Córdoba, Argentina [click to enlarge]

Pyrocumulonimbus cloud in Argentina

GOES-16 Visible (0.64 µm, top), Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm, center) and Infrared Window (10.3 µm) images [click to play animation]

GOES-16 Visible (0.64 µm, top), Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm, center) and Infrared Window (10.3 µm, bottom) images [click to play animation]

A large cluster of fires burning in central Argentina became hot enough to generate a brief pyrocumulonimbus (pyroCb) cloud on 29 January 2018; according to media reports, on that day there were winds of 55 km/hour (34 mph) and temperatures of 37 ºC (98.6 ºF) in the vicinity of these La Pampa province fires. GOES-16 (GOES-East) “Red” Visible (0.64 µm), Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm) images (above; also available as an MP4 animation) showed the smoke plumes, fire thermal anomalies or “hot spots” (red pixels) and the cold cloud-top infrared brightness temperatures, respectively. The minimum 10.3 µm temperature was -32.6 ºC at 1745 UTC. Note the relatively warm (darker gray) appearance on the 3.9 µm image — this is a characteristic signature of pyroCb clouds tops, driven by the aerosol-induced shift toward smaller ice particles (which act as more efficient reflectors of incoming solar radiation).

An Aqua MODIS True-color Red-Green-Blue (RGB) image viewed using RealEarth (below) showed the dense lower-tropospheric smoke drifting southward and southeastward from the fire source region, as well as the narrow upper-tropospheric anvil of the pyroCb cloud. Suomi NPP VIIRS fire detection locations are plotted as red dots on the final zoomed-in image. The actual time of the Aqua satellite pass over Argentina was 1812 UTC.

Aqua MODIS True-color RGB image, with Suomi NPP VIIRS fire detection locations [click to enlarge]

Aqua MODIS True-color RGB image, with Suomi NPP VIIRS fire detection locations [click to enlarge]

According to Worldview the coldest MODIS Infrared Window (11.0 µm) cloud-top  brightness temperature was -41.2 ºC, thus surpassing the -40 ºC threshold that is generally accepted to classify it as a pyroCb. This is believed to be the first confirmed pyroCb event in South America.

Approximately 120 km north-northeast of the pyroCb cloud, rawinsonde data from Santa Rosa, Argentina (below) indicated that the -41 ºC cloud-top temperature corresponded to altitudes in the 10.8 to 11.6 km range. The air was very dry at that level in the upper troposphere, contributing to the rapid dissipation of the pyroCb cloud material as seen in GOES-16 imagery.

Plots of rawinsonde data from Santa Rosa, Argentina [click to enlarge]

Plots of rawinsonde data from Santa Rosa, Argentina [click to enlarge]

48-hour HYSPLIT forward trajectories originating from the center of the pyroCb cloud at altitudes of 7, 9 and 11 km (below) suggested that a rapid transport of smoke over the adjacent offshore waters of the Atlantic Ocean was likely at those levels.

HYSPLIT forward trajectories originating at altitudes of 7, 9 and 11 km [click to enlarge]

HYSPLIT forward trajectories originating at altitudes of 7, 9 and 11 km [click to enlarge]

On 30 January, Suomi NPP OMPS Aerosol Index values (below; courtesy of Colin Seftor, SSAI at NASA Goddard) were as high as 4.3 over the South Atlantic (at 41.81º South latitude, 53.22º West longitude, 17:31:34 UTC) — consistent with the HYSPLIT transport originating at 7 km.

Suomi NPP OMPS Aerosol Index on 30 January [click to enlarge]

Suomi NPP OMPS Aerosol Index on 30 January [click to enlarge]

Additional Suomi NPP VIIRS True-color and OMPS Aerosol Index images can be found on the OMPS Blog.

===== 01 February Update =====

This analysis of CALIPSO CALIOP data (courtesy of Mike Fromm, NRL) suggests that the upper-tropospheric smoke from this pyroCb event was transported as far as the eastern South Atlantic Ocean by 02 UTC on 01 February, having ascended to altitudes in the 9-10 km range.

Tornado near Eureka, California


A waterspout moved inland near the NWS Eureka forecast office during the late afternoon hours on 25 January 2018. The brief tornado caused some EF-0 damage (interestingly, it was the only report of severe weather in the US that day, and the first tornado in the Eureka forecast area since 1998).

A comparison of GOES-16 (GOES-East) “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm) images (below) showed the line of convection as it moved across the area (Eureka and the location of the 0040-0041 UTC tornado are a few miles south-southwest of the airport KACV) — the coldest cloud-top infrared brightness temperatures on the 0037 UTC and 0042 UTC GOES-16 images were -30.7ºC (dark blue color enhancement). Note: there were no western US images available from GOES-15 (GOES-West) between 0030 and 0100 UTC, due to a routine “New Day Schedule Transition” and a 0051 UTC Southern Hemisphere scan.

GOES-16

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm, left) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm, right) images, with plots of hourly surface reports [click to play animation]

There was an overpass of the NOAA-19 satellite about 2 hours prior to the Eureka tornado, at 2251 UTC. If we compare the NOAA-19 Visible (0.63 µm) image to the corresponding GOES-16 Visible (0.64 µm) image (below), a parallax shift to the west is evident with GOES-16 (which was scanning that same scene only 24 seconds later than NOAA-19: 22:52:23 UTC vs 22:51:59 UTC).

NOAA-19 and GOES-16 Visible images at 2252 UTC, with plots of 23 UTC surface reports [click to enlarge]

NOAA-19 and GOES-16 Visible images at 2252 UTC, with plots of 23 UTC surface reports [click to enlarge]

In the corresponding Infrared Window images from NOAA-19 (10.8 µm) and GOES-16 (10.3 µm) (below), the parallax shift was also apparent — and the coldest cloud-top infrared brightness temperatures associated with the convection just northwest of KACV were -36.2ºC and -35.2ºC, respectively. Given the very high viewing angle for GOES-16 (about 67 degrees over Eureka), the qualitative and quantitative satellite presentation compared quite favorably to that seen from the more direct overpass of NOAA-19.

NOAA-19 and GOES-16 Infrared Window images at 2252 UTC, with plots of 23 UTC surface reports [click to enlarge]

NOAA-19 and GOES-16 Infrared Window images at 2252 UTC, with plots of 23 UTC surface reports [click to enlarge]

As mentioned in the afternoon Area Forecast Discussion, offshore Sea Surface Temperature (SST) values were in the 50-55ºF range; this was also seen in a comparison of the nighttime and daytime MODIS SST product (below). With the presence of cold air aloft and relatively warm water at the surface, the lower troposphere was unstable enough to support the development and growth of showers and thunderstorms.

MODIS Sea Surface Temperature product [click to enlarge]

MODIS Sea Surface Temperature product [click to enlarge]

Blowing dust in Texas and Oklahoma

GOES-16

GOES-16 “Moisture” Infrared brightness temperature difference (10.3-12.3 µm) images, with hourly surface reports plotted in cyan [click to play animation]

Strong winds in the wake of a cold frontal passage created large areas of blowing dust across the Panhandle Plains of northwestern Texas after 16 UTC on 21 January 2018. GOES-16 “Moisture” or “split-window difference” (10.3 µm12.3 µm) images (above) showed that the leading edge of this airborne dust moved over far southwestern Oklahoma after 20 UTC. (Note to AWIPS users: the default enhancement for this GOES-16 “Moisture” Channel Difference product was changed to “Grid/lowrange enhanced” to better highlight the dust with shades of yellow)

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and Near-Infrared “Cirrus” (1.37 µm) images (below) also displayed blowing dust signatures; the surface visibility was restricted to 2-3 miles at some locations, with Big Spring briefly reporting only 1/4 mile from 20-21 UTC. The dust signature was apparent on the Cirrus imagery because this spectral band can be used to detect any airborne particles that are effective scatterers of light (such as cirrus ice crystals, volcanic ash, dust/sand or haze).

GOES-16

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images, with hourly reports of surface weather plotted in red and surface visibility (miles) plotted in red [click to play animation]

GOES-16 Near-Infrared

GOES-16 Near-Infrared “Cirrus” (1.37 µm) images, with hourly reports of surface weather plotted in red and surface visibility (miles) plotted in red [click to play animation]

A Cirrus band is also available with the MODIS instrument on the Terra and Aqua satellites (as well as the VIIRS instrument on Suomi NPP and NOAA-20) — a comparison of Visible (0.65 µm), Cirrus (1.37 µm), Shortwave Infrared (3.7 µm) and Infrared Window (11.0 µm) images from Terra and Aqua (below) highlighted the differing appearance of the blowing dust features as sensed by each of those spectral bands. The airborne dust exhibited a darker signature in the Shortwave Infrared images since the small dust particles were efficient reflectors of incoming solar radiation, thus appearing warmer at 3.7 µm.

Terra MODIS Visible (0.65 µm), Cirrus (1.37 µm), Shortwave Infrared (3.7 µm) and Infrared Window (11.0 µm) images, with surface reports plotted in cyan [click to enlarge]

Terra MODIS Visible (0.65 µm), Cirrus (1.37 µm), Shortwave Infrared (3.7 µm) and Infrared Window (11.0 µm) images, with surface reports plotted in cyan [click to enlarge]

Aqua MODIS Visible (0.65 µm), Cirrus (1.37 µm), Shortwave Infrared (3.7 µm) and Infrared Window (11.0 µm) images, with surface reports plotted in cyan [click to enlarge]

Aqua MODIS Visible (0.65 µm), Cirrus (1.37 µm), Shortwave Infrared (3.7 µm) and Infrared Window (11.0 µm) images, with surface reports plotted in cyan [click to enlarge]

Pilot reports within 20-45 minutes after the Terra overpass time (below) revealed Moderate to Severe turbulence at an elevation of 8000 feet, just southeast of the most dense dust plume feature (highlighted by the cooler, lighter gray infrared brightness temperatures) — this was likely due to strong wind shear in the vicinity of the rapidly-advancing cold front. Farther to the southwest, another pilot report indicated that the top of the blowing dust was at 7000 feet, with a flight-level visibility of 3 miles at 10,000 feet.

Terra MODIS Infrared Window (11.0 µm) image, with a pilot report of turbulence highlighted in red [click to enlarge]

Terra MODIS Infrared Window (11.0 µm) image, with a pilot report of turbulence highlighted in red [click to enlarge]

Terra MODIS Infrared Window (11.0 µm) image, with a pilot report of dust layer top and flight level visibility highlighted in red [click to enlarge]

Terra MODIS Infrared Window (11.0 µm) image, with a pilot report of dust layer top and flight level visibility highlighted in red [click to enlarge]

Ice dam in Lake Erie

GOES-16

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images, with hourly surface wind barbs plotted in yellow and wind gusts (knots) plotted in cyan [click to play animation]

Thanks to Dave Zaff (NWS Buffalo) for the email alerting us to an ice dam that had formed across the eastern portion of Lake Erie on 19 January 2018 — GOES-16 (GOES-East) “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images (above) showed that the northeastward drift of ice floes was effectively being blocked by this ice dam feature.

A toggle between 250-meter resolution Terra MODIS True-color and False-color Red-Green-Blue (RGB) images from the MODIS Today site (below) provided a more detailed view of the Lake Erie ice dam and upwind drift ice at 1615 UTC. Snow and ice appear as shades of cyan in the False-color image, in contrast to supercooled water droplet clouds which are shades of white.

Terra MODIS True-color and False-color RGB images [click to enlarge]

Terra MODIS True-color and False-color RGB images; red arrows denote the location of the ice dam [click to enlarge]

The Terra MODIS Visible (0.65 µm) image with an overlay of RTMA surface winds (below) showed the southwesterly flow across the long axis of the lake.

Terra MODIS Visible (0.65 µm) image with surface METAR reports and RTMA surface winds [click to enlarge]

Terra MODIS Visible (0.65 µm) image with surface METAR reports and RTMA surface winds [click to enlarge]

A toggle between 1607 UTC Terra MODIS and 1757 UTC Suomi NPP VIIRS Visible images (below) showed the motion of the lake drift ice during that time period.

Terra MODIS and Suomi NPP VIIRS Visible images, with METAR surface reports [click to enlarge]

Terra MODIS and Suomi NPP VIIRS Visible images, with METAR surface reports [click to enlarge]

Severe turbulence over Hawai’i

GOES-15 Water Vapor (6.5 µm) images, with hourly pilot reports of turbulence [click to play animation]

GOES-15 Water Vapor (6.5 µm) images, with hourly pilot reports of turbulence [click to play animation]

Numerous pilot reports of moderate to severe turbulence were received over the Hawai’i area on 12 January 2018 — and GOES-15 (GOES-West) Water Vapor (6.5 µm) images (above; also available as an MP4) showed the development of a quasi-stationary gravity wave train over the northwestern portion of the island chain which appeared to be associated with many of these pilot reports.

HNL UA /OV 2115N16010W/TM 2241/FL320/TP B767/TB CONT MOD TURB

HNL UUA /OV 2115N16048W/TM 2255/FL340/TP H/B747/TB MOD-SEV TURB

HNL UUA /OV BOARD/TM 2350/FL370/TP H/B772/TB SEVERE TURB

PHNL UUA /OV 2443N 15516W /TM 2358 /FL370 /TP B737 /TB SEV 370 /RM ZOA CWSU AWC-WEB

In spite of the large satellite viewing angle, these waves were also very evident on Himawari-8 Lower-level (7.3 µm), Mid-level (6.9 µm) and Upper-level (6.2 µm) Water Vapor images (below; also available as an MP4). The 3 Water Vapor bands on the Himawari AHI are nearly identical to the 3 Water Vapor bands on the GOES-R series ABI.

Himawari-8 Low-level (7.3 µm, left), Mid-level (6.9 µm, center) and 6.2 µm, right) Water Vapor images, with hourly pilot reports of turbulence [click to play animation]

Himawari-8 Low-level (7.3 µm, left), Mid-level (6.9 µm, center) and Upper-level (6.2 µm, right) Water Vapor images, with hourly pilot reports of turbulence [click to play animation]

A toggle between 1-km resolution Terra MODIS Water Vapor (6.7 µm), Infrared Window (11.0 µm) and 250-meter resolution true-color Red-Green-Blue RGB images at 2106 UTC on 12 January (below) showed that no high-altitude clouds were associated with the gravity wave features — thus, these aircraft encounters were examples of Clear Air Turbulence (CAT).

Terra MODIS Water Vapor (6.7 µm) and True-color RGB images [click to enlarge]

Terra MODIS Water Vapor (6.7 µm), Infrared Window (11.0 µm) and true-color RGB images [click to enlarge]

A color-enhanced version of the Aqua MODIS Water Vapor (6.7 µm) image at 0014 UTC on 13 January is shown below (courtesy of Jordan Gerth, CIMSS).

An AWIPS screen capture (below, courtesy of Robert Bohlin, NWS Honolulu and Jordan Gerth, CIMSS) displays a High Pass filter product along with the 3 individual Himawari-8 Water Vapor band images at 0120 UTC on 13 January.

Upper-level Water Vapor (6.2 µm, upper right), Mid-level Water Vapor (6.9 µm, lower left) and Lower-level Water Vapor (7.3 µm, lower right) images [click to enlarge]

Himawari-8 High Pass filter product (6.9 µm, upper left), Upper-level Water Vapor (6.2 µm, upper right), Mid-level Water Vapor (6.9 µm, lower left) and Lower-level Water Vapor (7.3 µm, lower right) images [click to enlarge]

It bears mention that the rawinsonde data from Lihue, Hawai’i at 0000 UTC on 13 January (below) indicated significant wind shear (both speed and directional) within the 200-300 hPa layer (text listing) — the layer in which many of the turbulence reports were found.

Rawinsonde data from Lihue, Hawai'i at 00 UTC on 13 January [click to enlarge]

Rawinsonde data from Lihue, Hawai’i at 00 UTC on 13 January [click to enlarge]

The packet of gravity waves was directly over Lihue (red asterisk) at that time (below).

GOES-15 Water Vapor (6.5 µm) image at 0000 UTC on 13 January, with pilot reports of turbulence plotted. The red asterisk denotes the location of Lihue [click to enlarge]

GOES-15 Water Vapor (6.5 µm) image at 0000 UTC on 13 January, with pilot reports of turbulence plotted. The red asterisk denotes the location of Lihue [click to enlarge]

Ice floes in Chesapeake Bay

Landsat-8 false-color RGB image [click to enlarge]

Landsat-8 false-color RGB image [click to enlarge]

In the wake of the explosive cyclogenesis off the East Coast of the US on 04 January 2018, very cold air began to spread across much of the eastern half of the Lower 48 states. Focusing on the Hampton Roads area of southeastern Virginia, satellite imagery began to show the formation of ice in the rivers and bays. On 06 January, a 30-meter resolution Landsat-8 false-color Red-Green-Blue (RGB) image viewed using RealEarth (above) revealed some of this ice — in particular, long narrow ice floes (snow and ice appear as shades of cyan) that likely emerged from the Back River (northeast of Hampton) and were drifting northward and southward just off the coast of the Virginia Peninsula.

On the following day (07 January), 250-meter resolution Terra MODIS true-color and false-color RGB images from the MODIS Today site (below) showed that a larger V-shaped ice floe was located just southeast of the Peninsula, with its vertex pointed toward the Hampton Roads Bridge-Tunnel (HRBT). Snow and ice also appear as shades of cyan in the MODIS false-color image.

Terra MODIS true-color and false-color RGB images [click to enlarge]

Terra MODIS true-color and false-color RGB images [click to enlarge]

07 January also happened to be the last full day of imagery to be broadcast by the GOES-13 satellite — a comparison of 1-minute Mesoscale Sector GOES-16 (GOES-East) Visible (0.64 µm) and 15-30 minute interval GOES-13 Visible (0.63 µm) images (below) showed that the V-shaped ice floe continued to drift southwestward toward the HRBT. However, it was difficult to tell whether the ice feature made it over and past the tunnel; even with the improved GOES-16 Visible spatial resolution (0.5 km at satellite sub-point, compared to 1.0 km for GOES-13) and the 1-minute rapid image scans, the ice floe became harder to track during the afternoon hours before high clouds began to overspread the region.

"GOES-16

GOES-16 Visible (0.64 µm, left) and GOES-13 Visible (0.63 µm, right) images, with hourly surface air temperatures (ºF) plotted in yellow [click to play MP4 animation]

However, a close examination of Suomi NPP VIIRS true-color and false-color images at 1826 UTC (below) indicated that some of the ice had indeed moved westward past Fort Monroe (on the far southeastern tip of the Peninsula) and over/past the HRBT.

Suomi NPP VIIRS true-color and false-color RGB images [click to enlarge]

Suomi NPP VIIRS true-color and false-color RGB images [click to enlarge]

On the topic of cold temperatures in southeastern Virginia, a new daily record low of -3 ºF was set at Richmond on the morning of 07 January, and at Norfolk new daily record low and record low maximum temperatures were set (10 ºF and 23 ºF, respectively).